Build an Atom Model 

 

Materials:

Do Not Tell your parents that you HAVE to go to the store and BUY STUFF!! 

RECYCLE JUNK FROM AROUND THE HOUSE.

SUGGESTIONS:  cotton balls, toy balls, aluminum foil, candy, food items, toothpicks, coat hangers, old boxes, paper, tape glue, markers, beads, broken things, egg cartons, string, . . . .

 Also, do not use information from web sites or books to design your atom model.  We are learning the basics of atomic structure (or for your science-minded parents/older siblings- orbitals).  Outside sources will show all the exceptions to the rules, and we are just trying to learn the rules.  ( I have to leave some surprises for you to learn in High School Chemistry)  Please follow the atomic structure notes taken in class.  E-mail me if you have questions, or draw a rough draft and show it to me prior to construction.

Directions: 

1. Find the number of subatomic particles your element has

My Element ________________

# protons ___________________

# neutrons __________________

# electrons __________________

 

2. Decide where your elementís subatomic particles go

In the Nucleus __________________________________________________________

Energy Level (Shell) 1 ____________________________________________________

Energy Level (Shell) 2 ____________________________________________________

Energy Level (Shell) 3 ____________________________________________________

Energy Level (Shell) 4 ____________________________________________________

 

3. Decide if your model will hang from the ceiling or have a stand to sit on the counter.

4. Pick out your materials and make a KEY with the including information

            Atomic Name & Atomic Symbol

            Atomic Number & Atomic Mass

            Number of Protons

            Number of Neutrons              Make a color key for these parts

            Number of Electrons

            Your Name & Class Period

5. Build your model, attach your KEY and bring to science class on December 3rd or 4th

6. Present in class by telling us how many parts your atom has, where they are located, and what materials you used.